Dis-M-Body by Ken Rinaldo and Amy Youngs is a multi-sensory, interactive installation exploring the disembodied nature of information and messages as they dislocate and fracture one’s sense of self, while simultaneously expanding one’s sense of connection. Our sense of self is no longer created through direct experiences but instead through mediated and simulated experience. Fictive fluid worlds. Our senses continue to extend far beyond the physical limits of our bodies; virtual spaces and ideas are brought to us not by our fingers, ears or eyes but by video cameras, satellites, and digital wires. It is difficult to know where the individual body begins and our extended senses end.

While these technologies amplify and clarify our knowledge, they also diminish and shrink our sense of self. The instantaneous quality of the information – with today’s information and images replacing yesterday’s, – places us in a perpetual present. A constant flux. It places us at the center of an unknown self which is as fleeting as these electronic pulses. What is concrete are our connections. Indeed, electronic communications may help us realize that the individual self is a knot embedded in a relational network of others. When this knot is unraveled the self may also unravel.

The Dis-M-Body Collaborative, 1995, was a multimedia installation that utilized sound, light, and water to give metaphorical meaning to increasingly disembodied human existence in a digital age.

To view Video Dissection, you look through a hole in the floor and see your own behind turned to the side.

Video Dissection by Ken Rinaldo and Amy Youngs premiere ACME Gallery San Francisco California 1995
Video Dissection by Ken Rinaldo and Amy Youngs premiere ACME Gallery San Francisco California 1995

Made of human hair, the “rug” of Genetic Blueprint, contains the genetic information from hundreds of unsuspecting people who had their hair cut in my neighborhood. This hair was collected from 5 salons in our SF neighborhood with the help of barbers who agreed to hand over this DNA in hair.

Genetic Blueprint by Ken Rinaldo and Amy Youngs premiere ACME Gallery San Francisco California 1995
Genetic Blueprint by Ken Rinaldo and Amy Youngs premiere ACME Gallery San Francisco California 1995

Barrier Penetrations involves a video camera, tape recorder, and amplifier, placed inside plaster cones covered with computer paper. Penetrating through the gallery walls these extensions allow people on either side to communicate. However, while you speak, you cannot hear well, or see, leading to a fractured communication experience. This is further confused by pre-taped audio conversations coming from tape recorders hidden in the cones. Tape recorder, amplifiers, plaster cones covered with computer paper.

Barrier Penetrations by Ken Rinaldo and Amy Youngs. Holes in walls with tube covered with computer paper. You could speak to others on the other side of wall though you could not speak and look to who you were broadcasting. Inside each tube was also tape recorded conversations.
Barrier Penetrations by Ken Rinaldo and Amy Youngs. Premiere at ACME Gallery San Francisco California 1995

Message Slough involves lint, buttons, and a sound sampler. Messages can be spoken into the cone and played back, but our messages are like our flecks of lint: we only have so much control of where they go. In this case, messages are randomly broadcast.

Message Slough by Amy Youngs and Ken Rinaldo. Premiere at ACME Gallery San Francisco California 1995
Message Slough by Amy Youngs and Ken Rinaldo. Premiere at ACME Gallery San Francisco California 1995

Fluid Desires is a water fountain created with plastic from product packaging. It suggests that fuel for the techno-revolution begins with insatiable consumerist behavior. In this fountain red water runs from one clear plastic coating to another. These plastic coatings, like ghosts, have retained the forms of the products they covered. The circulating water filling the plastic voids and trickling down to the next, suggests that fuel for the techno-revolution begins with our insatiable consumerist behavior. (15′ x 7′ x 3′)

Fluid Desires by Amy Youngs and Ken Rinaldo premiere ACME Gallery San Francisco California 1995
Fluid Desires by Amy Youngs and Ken Rinaldo premiere ACME Gallery San Francisco California 1995

Limited Domain Meaning Machine involves a washing machine tub, motor, light, electronics, Velcro, and Ping-Pong balls with dry transfer lettering. When viewers approach, the machine and light turn on and mix balls with techno-words on them. Viewers choose balls to place on the wall to create meanings that are limited to technospeak.

Limited Domain Meaning Machine by Ken Rinaldo and Amy Youngs Premiere at ACME Gallery San Francisco 1995. Washing machine tub, motor, light, electronics, velcro and ping-pong balls with dry transfer lettering.
Limited Domain Meaning Machine by Ken Rinaldo and Amy Youngs Premiere at ACME Gallery San Francisco 1995. Washing machine tub, motor, light, electronics, Velcro and ping-pong balls with dry transfer lettering.

This piece arises out of the Sapir and Whorf hypothesis that what we say is structured and influenced by the nature of our language. Sapir and Whorf believed that languages like German were good for engineering because they are highly descriptive while native Americans have less difficulty understanding Einstein’s Theory of Relativity because the language does not have absolute conceptions of time. The words on the ping-pong balls are all technospeak.

Limited Domain Meaning Machine by Ken Rinaldo and Amy Youngs Premiere at ACME Gallery San Francisco 1995. Washing machine tub, motor, light, electronics, velcro and ping-pong balls with dry transfer lettering.
Limited Domain Meaning Machine by Ken Rinaldo and Amy Youngs Premiere at ACME Gallery San Francisco 1995. Washing machine tub, motor, light, electronics, Velcro and ping-pong balls with dry transfer lettering.

Their choice frames a cultural moment when all that is said within the realm of technology is hype and hyperbole and it transforms the dialogue and meanings associated with techno issues.

Magnetic Streams involves seven tape recorders placed around the room with three magnetic tape loops playing between them.

Magnetic Streams by Amy Youngs and Ken Rinaldo premiere ACME Gallery San Francisco California 1995
Magnetic Streams by Amy Youngs and Ken Rinaldo premiere ACME Gallery San Francisco California 1995

 Digital Scat below takes your voice secretly sampled and scatted back to you in real time.

Digital Scat by Ken Rinaldo and Amy Youngs Premiere at ACME Gallery San Francisco 1995.
Digital Scat by Ken Rinaldo and Amy Youngs Premiere at ACME Gallery San Francisco 1995.

Magnification Distortions looks at the how optical and philosophical lenses magnify, though they simultaneously distort and change the nature of what is seen, as do all of the technologies that humankind uses to formulate ideas about the world. Thus the perceptual aberrations that may occur with these lenses are less and less obvious. Languages a linguistic lens or condenser of information is most subject to mediation, both through individual interpretation though also through technological distortions.
Glass lens, and colored wire. (14″x 12″x 6″)

Magnification Distortions by Ken Rinaldo and Amy Youngs Premiere at ACME Gallery San Francisco 1995.
Magnification Distortions by Ken Rinaldo and Amy Youngs Premiere at ACME Gallery San Francisco 1995.

 

EXHIBITIONS

ACME Gallery San Francisco California, 2005

KEYWORDS

bio art, installation, interactive art, sound art, glass, fountain, interactive installation, light, motion