Trans-Species by Ken Rinaldo is an art/science exhibition created for The Museum for Insects created by Amy Youngs. Amy invited me to create this exhibit in her mini museum, that features artwork specifically created, to house and entertain crickets with contemporary art. Filling a complete museum of this scale was…well not easy, though was easier then making large scale installation. As I conceived of these artworks, I looked at cricket perception, relative scale, color, distinctive cricket head markings and their overall form. I tried to imagine what they would like to see, hear and interact with in their museum as this was after all, a chance to create interactive art for crickets.

Transpecies by Ken Rinaldo in Museum for Insects by Amy Youngs 2014
Trans-Species by Ken Rinaldo in Museum for Insects by Amy Youngs 2014

During this period of time, I was also working on the seed print series and realized the crickets would likely see my 3D works as actual seeds…though they were constructed artificial seeds. I felt they would appreciate the visuals of seeds, as suggestive of food. I also reproduced a photo of the distinctive pattern of the cricket head though with abstraction. The marking are distinctively cricket though I felt that abstraction of that sort especially as regards recognition of another cricket would allow the cricket to understand and at least register this work as some sort of portrait.

Mini Giclee print for Trans-Species by Ken Rinaldo in the Museum for Insects by Amy Youngs 2014
Mini Giclee print for Trans-Species by Ken Rinaldo in the Museum for Insects by Amy Youngs 2014

I was curious to see if monkey-bars for crickets in 3D software with rapid prototyping would allow them to enter and climb onto the minature scultpure, so when they did I was thrilled. I also was excited to create a sound work for them created with their own chirps shifted up and down in frequency, rhythm and tempo with melodyne software below.

Cricket Mobile constructed of yellow cricket legs by Ken Rinaldo for the Museum of Insects by Amy Youngs at the Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA, 2013
Cricket Mobile constructed of yellow cricket legs by Ken Rinaldo for the Museum of Insects by Amy Youngs at the Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA, 2013

Bringing cricket and human closer together I 3D modeled a double headed cricket on a cricket body and rapid prototyped this, with an artificial saddle. Again, I felt the cricket would want to see cricket figuration and the saddle on the cricket was meant to allow the human viewer/participant to psycho-project self onto the cricket rodeo sculpture. A yellow mobile created with crickets legs found in a fishing lure store again served to assert cricket form and interest.

Cricket monkey bars by Ken Rinaldo for the Museum of Insects by Amy Youngs at the Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA, 2013. Photo Amy Youngs from her web cam
Cricket monkey bars by Ken Rinaldo for the Museum of Insects by Amy Youngs at the Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA, 2013. Photo Amy Youngs from her web cam

If that was missed I also had a print of that on the wall to scale below.

Mini Giclee print for Trans-Species by Ken Rinaldo in the Museum for Insects 2014 by Amy Youngs
Mini Giclee print for Trans-Species by Ken Rinaldo in the Museum for Insects 2014 by Amy Youngs

When talking about the Museum for Insects, Amy Says “Inside, crickets can interact with hands-on/legs-on exhibits, enjoy food and drink from the café and experience live humans, both through a picture window and through a videophone chat that connects the Museum for Insects to the humans visiting the Peabody Essex Museum. Humans visiting us from the internet can visit our live webcam, and can activate a cricket puppet and electronic chirping instruments located within. Crickets deserve some respect – and a visit to their own museum.

Monkey bars for crickets center, lower left is sculpture Rodeo Cricket rapid prototyping monkey bars and upper right mobile made of cricket legs molded in plastic
Monkey bars for crickets center, lower left is sculpture Rodeo Cricket rapid prototyping monkey bars and upper right mobile made of cricket legs molded in plastic

We humans can come along too, but we must shrink ourselves down so we fit inside the Museum for Insects. And so we don’t crush anyone. This museum is a space for friendly interaction between humans and crickets. With a combination of contemporary artwork and current communication technologies we hope to increase human appreciation for insects and to provide a safe and enjoyable experience for the house cricket museum-goers.”

 

List of works I produced for this mini exhibition include: 

Rodeo Cricket Sculpture: 3D modeling and rapid prototyped sculpture.
Rodeo Cricket: Mini Giclee Print.
Bee Seed: Mini Giclee Print,
Hairy Light Seed: Mini Giclee Print.
Branch House Sculpture
: rapid prototype, human hair, and shrink wrap tubing.
Plastic Bloom sculpture: 3D modeling and rapid prototyped sculpture.
Star Seed: Mini Giclee Print.
Sploom Seed: Mini Giclee Print.
Worm Seed: Mini Giclee Print.
Cricket Leg Mobile: Silicone rubber.
Cricket Head Collage: Mini Giclee Print.
Glitch sculpture with female form: 3D rapid prototyped sculpture.

Sound Art Symphony for crickets: Melodyne manipulated cricket chirping.

UPCOMING EXHIBITIONS

EXHIBITIONS

PEABODY ESSEX MUSEUM, SALEM MASSACHUSETTS, 2013
Displayed Trans-Species a set of artworks designed to communicate with crickets in the Museum of Crickets by Amy Youngs.

Artist and director:

Design and rapid prototyping: Ken Rinaldo
3D modeling: Ken Rinaldo

CREDITS / TECHNICAL

The Museum for Insects by Amy Youngs

SHOW REQUIREMENT and DIMENSIONS

This work can be shown individually or in the Museum for Insects. For Trans-Species minatures rapid prototyping sculptures contact Ken Rinaldo and for the Museum of Insects contact Amy Youngs.

KEYWORDS

robotics, trans-species art, crickets, museum, interactive art, transspecies

BIBLIOGRAPHY